The Effects Of
Drugs
On The Body

The Effects Of
Drugs
On The Body

Click on the drugs to see
the effects they have on
the body

Ketamine

A feeling of ‘floating’ is common when taking Ketamine. Depending on how much is consumed, this can generally last for 30 minutes. Hallucinations, feeling restless and anxiousness are also typical.
Longer lasting effects can include speech and movement difficulties as well as feeling detached from the body.

Affected body Parts:
  • Speech
  • Bladder
  • Limbs

Ecstasy

Ecstasy can cause someone to be more energetic, confident and talkative. Music and colours can also feel more intense. Confusion and lockjaw can also be experienced.
During a ‘comedown’, people can feel down, dizzy, dehydrated and sick. They can also suffer from muscle ache and headaches.
Sustained use can also lead to disturbed sleep, psychosis, panic attacks and anxiety.

Affected body Parts:
  • Brain
  • Stomach

Nitrous Oxide (‘Laughing Gas’)

Users can feel relaxed, happy and euphoric after inhaling ‘laughing gas’. It can also cause hallucinations and dizziness.
There is a risk of death with nitrous oxide, as it restricts the flow of oxygen to the brain.
Regular use can lead to nerve damage, which can cause tingling, pains and difficulty walking.

Affected body Parts:
  • Toes
  • Fingers
  • Legs
  • Brain

Methamphetamine

Users can feel alert and awake, which can lead to agitation, aggression and confusion. Heart rate and blood pressure can rise, which can cause a risk of a heart attack. People also lose their appetite.
Long term abuse can contribute to panic attacks, psychotic episodes and brain damage.

Affected body Parts:
  • Brain
  • Heart

Heroin

Heroin is one of the most dangerous drugs in circulation. It is highly addictive and has serious health risks.
Immediate side effects can include a sense of wellbeing and relaxation as well as dizziness and vomiting.
Long-term intake can lead to collapsed veins and loss of body tissue, especially in the fingers, toes and limbs.

Affected body Parts:
  • Arteries/Veins
  • Loss of body tissue
  • Fingers/Toes/Limbs

'LEGAL HIGHS'

Many ‘legal highs’ are now illegal for human consumption, since the Psychoactive Substances Act in May 2016.
Drugs including “Spice”, “Clockwork Orange” and “Blue Cheese” can lead to someone to feel relaxed and euphoric, but can also cause hallucinations, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, confusion, aggression and seizures.

Affected body Parts:
  • Heart
  • Brain

LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide)

Users experience hallucinations. Time can appear slower or faster, and physical objects can seem distorted.
Flashbacks to ‘bad trips’ can happen months and even years after taking LSD. Long term use can also intensify or contribute to mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

Affected body Parts:
  • Heart
  • Brain

Cocaine

Cocaine is a highly addictive drug that raises the body’s temperature, makes the heart beat faster and can lead to overconfident or aggressive behaviour. These effects last for around 30 minutes, depending on how much is taken. When the effects wear off, a user can experience a ‘comedown’, where they feel depressed, anxious and paranoid.
Long term use can damage the kidneys, blood vessels and cause nasal damage.

Affected body Parts:
  • Heart
  • Nose
  • Blood Vessels
  • Kidneys

Cannabis

Cannabis can make a person feel more relaxed and happy. Other symptoms include an increased appetite and lethargy. It can also cause someone to feel light-headed, faint and sick, with persistent use worsening the symptoms.
In some cases, persistent use has been linked to the onset of psychotic illnesses, particularly in those genetically vulnerable.

Affected body Parts:
  • Brain
  • Stomach